<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" /> <title>Photoshop for Photographers - Week3 --Photoshop Settings and more</title> <style type="text/css"> /* "*" means Universal applies to all CSS */ /* ================================ * { padding: 0; margin: 0; } ================================ */ body { font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; height:100%; } #wrapper { height: 100%; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; width: 1024px; } #header { color: #333; width: 1024px; float: left; padding: 10px 10px 0 10px; border: 1px solid #c03; height: auto; background: #ccc; } #header img {float: left; display: block; margin: 1em; padding-right: 1em;} #navigation { float: left; width: 960px; color: #333; padding: 10px; border: 1px solid #c03; margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; background: #999; } #navigation { FONT-SIZE: 93%; BACKGROUND: url(bg.gif) #dae0d2 repeat-x 50% bottom; FLOAT: left; WIDTH: 100%; LINE-HEIGHT: normal } #navigation UL { PADDING-RIGHT: 10px; PADDING-LEFT: 10px; PADDING-BOTTOM: 0px; MARGIN: 0px; PADDING-TOP: 10px; LIST-STYLE-TYPE: none } #navigation LI { PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 9px; BACKGROUND: url(left.gif) no-repeat left top; FLOAT: left; PADDING-BOTTOM: 0px; MARGIN: 0px; PADDING-TOP: 0px } #navigation A { PADDING-RIGHT: 15px; DISPLAY: block; PADDING-LEFT: 6px; FONT-WEIGHT: bold; BACKGROUND: url(right.gif) no-repeat right top; FLOAT: left; PADDING-BOTTOM: 4px; COLOR: #765; PADDING-TOP: 5px; TEXT-DECORATION: none } #navigation A { FLOAT: none } #navigation A:hover { COLOR: #333 } #navigation #current { BACKGROUND-IMAGE: url(left_on.gif) } #navigation #current A { BACKGROUND-IMAGE: url(right_on.gif); PADDING-BOTTOM: 5px; COLOR: #333 } #leftcolumn { color: #333; border: 1px solid #c03; background: #ccc; margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; height: 100%; width: 100px; float: left; } #content { float: left; color: #333; border: 1px solid #c03; background: #e6e6e6; margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; height: 100%; width:800px; } #content h2 {color:red;} #rightcolumn { color: #333; border: 1px solid #c03; background: #ccc; margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; height: 350px; width: 200px; float: left; } #footer { width: 960px; clear: both; color: #333; border: 1px solid #c03; background: #999; margin: 0px 0px 10px 0px; padding: 10px; } </style> </head> <body> <!-- Begin Wrapper --> <div id="wrapper"> <!-- Begin Header --> <div id="header"> <h1>Lightroom &#8594; Photoshop Color Management and Settings</h1> <ul> <li>Photoshop</li> <ol> <li>Preferences</li> <li>Color Management</li> <li>The Tool Bar</li> </ol> </ul> </div> <!-- End Header --> <!-- Begin Navigation --> <div id="navigation"> <ul> <li ><a href="FileTypes.html">Image File Types</a></li> <li id="current"><a href="settingPS.html">Lightroom &#8594; Photoshop Settings</a></li> </ul> </div> <!-- End Navigation --> <!-- Begin Left Column --> <div id="leftcolumn"> <h3>OS Computer Settings!</h3> <p>It's important that you know the extension of your photographs</p> <div style="font-family: serif; font-weight: bold;">Mac and Windows OS's by default hide the 3 letter file extension for all files... You need to know what they are as the extensions are part of the filename and is needed by ALL browsers so they knows what to do with the file...Here's how you set that up</div> <div style="font-family: serif; font-weight: bold;">On Windows XP</div> <ul style="font-family: serif; font-weight: bold;"> <li>Open My Computer, and select Folder Options from the Tools menu</li> <li>Click on the View tab, turn off Hide MS-DOS file extensions for known file types, by unchecking the box </li> <li>Press OK.</li> </ul> <div><span style="font-family: serif;"><strong>On Windows Vista</strong></span></div> <div> <ul> <li><span style="font-family: serif;"><strong><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 17px;">Go to My Computer and choose Organize &gt; Folder and Search Options</span></strong></span></li> <li><span style="font-family: serif;"><strong><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 17px;">Select the View tab and deselect "<strong>Hide extensions" for known file types</strong> </span></strong></span></li> <li><span style="font-family: serif;"><strong><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 17px;">Press OK. </span></strong></span></li> </ul> <div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><span style="font-size: 13px; line-height: 17px;"><strong>On Windows 7</strong></span></span></div> </div> <div> <ul> <li><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 17px;"><strong>Open an Explorer window and choose Organize &gt; Folder and Search Options</strong></span></li> <li><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 17px;"><strong>Select the View tab -- and deselect the </strong></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 17px;"><strong>Hide extensions for known file types</strong></span></li> <li><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 17px;"><strong>Press OK. </strong></span></li> </ul> </div> <div><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><span style="font-size: 13px; line-height: 17px;"><strong>To see the above with pictures and arrows go to </strong><a href="http://www.indezine.com/products/other/windows/showfileextensions.html#win7"><strong>Indezine.com</strong></a><strong> </strong></span></span></div> <h3 style="font-family: serif; font-weight: bold;"><big><big>Making Extensions visible in OS X (Mac)</big></big></h3> <div style="font-family: serif; font-weight: bold;"><a style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-JZWX-ZITJFM/TZ1dhIIN9CI/AAAAAAAACTE/3FfP5cvjLZA/s1600/Finderprefs.jpg"><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-JZWX-ZITJFM/TZ1dhIIN9CI/AAAAAAAACTE/3FfP5cvjLZA/s320/Finderprefs.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="100" /></a>open the Finder, then choose<br /> Menu<br /> Finder &gt; Preferences<br /> Choose the Advanced Tab<br /> Check the Show all file extensions box<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Got a question, send that email!<br /> <br /> </div> </div> <!-- End Left Column --> <!-- Begin Content Column --> <div id="content"> <h2>Photoshop/Photoshop Elements PREFERENCE Settings</h2> <h3>Preferences</h3> <p>Menu Item (PC)<br /> Edit > Preferences, or <br /> Keyboard Short Cut<br /> Control K<br /> Menu Item Mac<br /> Photoshop > Preferences, or <br /> Keyboard Short Cut<br /> Command K </p> <p><em>Some of the preferences you'll change to your own "tastes" as you become more familiar with the operation and workings within Photoshop!</em></p> <ul> <li>Preferences</li> <ol> <li>General ---&gt; No Changes</li> <li>Interface</li> <ol> <li>You might want to make the fonts in the UI (User Interface) Larger! In the Dialogue Box UI Text Options: UI Font Size: Choices are Small, Medium or Large.</li> </ol> <li>File Handling </li> <ol> <li>Bottom of the page, Change recent File List Contains: Change from 10 to say "30" files </li> </ol> <li>Performance</li> <ol> <li>Memory Usage ---&gt; only change if you have 8 gigs of memory... or more& </li> <li>History & Cache</li> <ol> <li>History States ---&gt; Increase to 80? If Photoshop runs slowly, then decrease this number. Default is 20 </li> <li>Cache Levels ---&gt; Lot's of Memory? Change to 8</li> <li>Cache Tile Size ---&gt; Increase size if you are processing "large" photographs!</li> </ol> <li>Scratch Disk</li> <ol> <li>Use an internal drive separate from your boot drive. <li>If you use a detachable external drive set the internal (boot) drive as the second choice. Use the arrows to change scratch disk order and priority.</li> </ol> <li>GPU Settings</li> <ol> <li>If you don't have a graphics card some features will go "Missing" in Photoshop. <li> This is one area where a good graphics card will vastly improve Photoshops performance. </li> </ol> <li>Cursors ---> No Change</li> <li>Transparency & Gamut ---> No Change</li> <li>Units and Rulers</li> <ol> <li>Units ---> I prefer "pixels"</li> </ol> <li>Guides, Grid a& Slices --> No Changes </li> <li>Plug-ins</li> <ol> <li>If you have lots of "Plugins" Installing them in a separate folder make upgrading to a new version of Photoshop easier.</li> </ol> <li>Type</li> <ol> <li>Change Font Preview Size: To "HUGE"</li> </ol> <li>While on the "Type" page press the "Next" Button</li> <ol> <li>A Screen for 3-D settings will pop up --->No Changes here.</li></ol> </ol> </ul> <p><em>Most of the <strong>Preference changes </strong> won't take effect until you quit Photoshop and restart it!</em></p> <h3>Color Management: Photoshop Elements (PSE) </h3> <p> PSE menu item:<br /> Edit > Color Settings:<br /> You'll see this, Choose "Always Optimize for Printing" <img src="../PS-P2Site/images/PSEColorsettings.jpg" alt="PSEColorsettings" width="622" height="458" /></p> <p><em>Always Optimize For Printing Uses Adobe RGB as the RGB working space; the Grayscale working space is Dot Gain 20%. This option preserves embedded profiles and assigns Adobe RGB when opening untagged files.</em></p> <h2>The Lightroom &#8594; Photoshop round trip </h2> <h2>Edit in... </h2> <img src="images/edit-in.png" alt="edit-in" width="599" height="131" style="float:left; border:1px black solid; margin: 6px;" /><br style="clear:left;" /> <p>Sending a "Raw" file to Photoshop needs to be converted from the raw linear data into an RGB bitmapped file. You edit pixels in Photoshop.</p> <p><em><strong>You also need to make sure the Color Space in Photoshop matches what you see in Lightroom.</strong></em></p> <h2> To Send your image(s) From Lightroom to Photoshop for editing!</h2> <h3>Editing in Adobe Photoshop CC... </h3> <ul><li>To edit as RGB bitmap</li> <li>Single image -- Detailed retouching </ul> <li>Open As Smart Object in Photoshop... When you need to do a <mark>Local Edit</mark> That cannot be done in Lightroom!</li> <ul><li> Example: <a href="http://uofgts.com/Lightroom/smartobj/index.html">Edit as a Smart Object in Photoshop</a> <ul> <li>Compositing different selections from the same image</li> <li>To Preserve Raw data for future edits</li> </ul> <hr> <li> <mark> You can NOW do these two things in Lightroom using the Merge to Menu! </mark> <ul> <ol> <li>Merge to Panorama.</li> <li> Merge to HDR...</li> </ol> <h3>You can still do HDR and Panoramas in Photoshop using the EDIT IN Menu</h3> <ul> <li>Right Click on the thumbnail choose Edit in > Merge to HDR in Photoshop... <li>Lightroom now has a 32 bit pipeline in the Develop Module.</li> <li>Use Photoshop to composite the bracketed exposures</li> <li>In Photoshop choose the 32 bit file, but DO NOT PROCESS in Photoshop</li> <li>Save the file back to Lightroom as a 32bit TIFF file</li> <li>Edit in the Develop Module </li> <ul> <li><strong>Should yield a better looking more realistic HDR'd image!</strong></li> </ul> </ul> <hr> <li>Open as Layers in Photoshop...</li> <ul> <li>Compositing or aligning multiple layers </li> <li>A real huge time saver</li> </ul></ul> <h2>The Color Space Setup in</h2> <h2>Lightroom ------------------------------------------------&rarr;Photoshop</h2> <img src="images/LR-psprefs.png" alt="LR-psprefs" width="400" height="450" style="float:left; border:1px black solid; margin: 6px;"> <a href="images/PS-prefs.png" ><img src="images/PS-prefs.png" alt="PS-prefs" width="275" height="350" style="float:left; border:1px black solid; margin: 6px;"></a> <br style="clear:left;" /> <p>For more information about color management read this chapter from <a href="http://www.photoshopforphotographers.com/pscs5/downloads/PSCS5-colormanage.pdf">Martin Evening's Photoshop Book</a> Adobe Photoshop CS5 for Photographers is published by Focal Press. ISBN: 0780240522005</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.digitalmastery.com/downloads/pdf/Color_Management.pdf">Manage Color -Simple By Ben Wilmore</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.photoshopforphotographers.com/pscs5/downloads/PSCS5-colormanage.pdf">Manage Color -Complex by Martin Evening</a></li> </ul> </p> <h2>Tool Bar Setting </h2> <h4>The eye dropper --color sampler</h4> <p>The eye dropper TOOL is found in the tool bar. Select it by clicking on it.</p> <p>Then in the eye dropper options bar. (If it is not visible) the menu item is:<br /> (Mac & PC) Windows &gt; Options<br /> In the options bar click the check mark and choose 5 x 5 Average </p> <p><em>Camera Raw and Lightroom's color sampler uses a 5 x 5 sampled matrix.</em></p> <h2> Setting Black, Mid-gray and White values for layers and curves</span></h2> <br /> <h2>In photoshop Elements</h2> <br /> Look Under the Enhance menu select Adjust Lighting &gt; Levels<br /> <h2>In Photoshop </h2> The Menu is: Layer &gt; New Adjustment Layer &gt; Levels...<br /> Keyboard shortcut:<br /> PC it's Control L,<br /> Mac it's Command L.<br /> <br /> To set the black point double click the Black eye dropper <ul> <li>Change</li> <li>R setting to 10</li> <li>G setting to 10</li> <li>B setting to 10</li> </ul> <p>then click okay To set the White Point </p> <p>double click the White Eye Dropper </p> <ul> <li>Change</li> <li>R setting to 240</li> <li>G setting to 240</li> <li>B setting to 240</li> </ul> <p>then click okay To set the Gray Point double click the Grey Eye Dropper </p> <ul> <li>Change</li> <li>R setting to 133</li> <li>G setting to 133</li> <li>B setting to 133</li> </ul> <p>then click okay </p> <p>Now click okay in the requester will pop up that asks if you want to "save the new target colors as defaults?" </p> <p>Click Yes<br /> </p> <p><br /> </p> <h2>Now were ready to Image Process <u>IN PHOTOSHOP!</u> </h2> <p><span style="font-weight: bold; font-style: italic;">Rule #4: Do not assume..that if the picture you are photographing doesn't turn out, you can fix it in Photoshop,&nbsp; ImageFX&nbsp;</span> or some other image processing software. You will be sorely disappointed! Remember, with a digital camera, you don't use film... you can shoot until you run out of storage memory and you can always delete (heaven forbid)&nbsp; failed pictures.<br /> </p> <p style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-weight: bold;">Always remember this Absolute Rule:&nbsp; Do Not, not ever,&nbsp; Throw Away Data!</span></p> <ul> <li>Use contrast and brightness controls carefully and sparingly as these tools changes whole pixel values... you actually wind up throwing away information when you save the result. In other words, the data you changed using contrast and brightness is a one way street...there is no way to get back to the original data set.</li> <li>Use and exaggerate color balance controls: R, G, B, or Hue / Saturation, or CYMK</li> <li>These functions control or manipulate data in the colour look up table, only changing their values not not throwing them away. You can reset or revert the "color look up data" back to its original state, even after you have saved the changes.</li> <li>Do Not Throw Away Data</li> <li>Never change image resolution.</li> <li>Yep, you got it, Do Not Throw Away Data.</li> </ul> <br /> <big><span style="font-weight: bold;">Level Controls</span></big><br /> You can use "Levels" to adjust color tone The test picture was shot in Guadalajara, Mexico on a dark sunless street, right around sunset, using a Nikkormat FT2 with a Vivitar f/2.8 28 90mm lens on KodaChrome 64 slide film.<br /> <br /> Ugh, it's way dark...The fix is to work with the mid grays. this is done using the "Levels" function and the sliders under the histogram's bell curve.<br /> <p>Here's what the controls do in The "Levels" Dialogue box </p> <div style="text-align: center;"><a href="PSimages/DP2-lesson031.jpg"><img src="PSimages/DP2-lesson031.jpg" alt="Levels Dialogue" style="border: 0px solid ; width: 562px; height: 295px;" /></a><br /> </div> <div style="text-align: center;"><a href="PSimages/Levels.jpg"><img src="PSimages/Levels.jpg" alt="Levels" style="border: 0px solid ; width: 600px; height: 625px;" /></a><br /> </div> <br /> <br /> Don't forget to flatten and save the "enhanced" picture.<br /> <br /> For an excellent getting up to speed tutorial on using PhotoShop go here... <a href="http://luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/instant_photoshop.shtml">http://luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/instant_photoshop.shtml</a><br /> <br /> Here's the details about the curves Dialogue box...<br /> <img style="width: 596px; height: 444px; top: 7713px; left: 228px;" alt="Same Photo, Old Lady in Mexico, using in the Curves dialogue" src="PSimages/Mexico-Curves.jpg" /><br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <h2>Layers </h2> How it works...<br /> <br /> <br /> <a href=""></a><br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> A tutorial for fixing Under and over exposed photos<br /> <br /> <br /> <a href="../PS-P2site/Overexposed.html">Overexposed Instructions</a><br /> </div> <!-- End Content Column --> <!-- Begin Right Column <div id="rightcolumn"> </div> End Right Column --> <!-- Begin Footer --> <div id="footer"> This is the Footer </div> <!-- End Footer --> </div> <!-- End Wrapper --> </body> </html>